Update: abstract submissions for the Promises of Monsters conference

Thank you to all who submitted abstracts for the conference! We’re grateful and excited to have received so many submissions – many more than anticipated – and incredibly happy to see this much interest in monsters and the monstrous.

Due to the amount of submissions, it has taken us a little longer to go through all the abstracts, but you should all have heard from us by the end of next week (the 5th of February at the latest). If you have not, then let us know at promisesofmonsters [at] gmail [dot] com

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Evolutionary Theory and Its Monstrous Wonders

 

By Donna McCormack

 

lucy-reconstruction_smallEvolutionary theory is a contentious issue, with even its own scientific veracity being denied. It is a subject of constant discussion and dispute in the media, popular culture and across many disciplines in academia. We need only think of the recent TV series of Orphan Black and of Google’s doodle on 24th November to celebrate 41 years of the discovery of Lucy (whose existence threw into question previous theories of bipedalism and brain size). Lucy’s existence shows us that the science of evolution is itself in the process of being uncovered, and yet, despite such uncertainties, little scientific emphasis is placed on what is at stake in proposing, accepting and discrediting particular interpretations of evolution. We often see a religious contention, which asserts that evolution is simply wrong, but what if we can think of evolutionary theory differently from the narrative that was challenged and rethought through the discovery of Lucy?

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